Thursday, August 21, 2014
Girls are not machines that you put kindness coins into until sex falls out. Sylvia Plath (via myrisingvoice)

(Source: incorrectsylviaplathquotes)

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

(Source: staticforces)

Tear gas

miggsie:

torisoulphoenix:

avoidgettingread:

Do not wear contact lenses if you are in a situation where you may be tear-gassed.  When I went through basic training, we were warned that there was a possibility the tear gas they were using could melt contact lenses.

BOOOOOOOOOOOST!!!!!!!!!!

my roommates friend was in istanbul during the protests and got tear gassed. it did in fact melt his contacts to his eyes and now he’s completely blind.
can you imagine that being the last thing you see?

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff. Daniel Radcliffe for London Magazine (x)

(Source: potterbird)

Monday, August 18, 2014
mulberry-cookies:

Ralph & Russo Fall 2014 Haute Couture (details)

mulberry-cookies:

Ralph & Russo Fall 2014 Haute Couture (details)

Sunday, August 17, 2014

"do you want another peach sangria?" she said

"Your whole bill will exceed 40 dollars," she did NOT SAY.

amy-ambrosio:

Tanya Katysheva at Elie Saab Haute Couture FALL 2014 by carolinelevybencheton .

amy-ambrosio:

Tanya Katysheva at Elie Saab Haute Couture FALL 2014 by carolinelevybencheton .

Saturday, August 16, 2014

I think I’m beginning to be able to name the pressure that I’m feeling.

Read More

coltre:

I covered my cat in flowers

coltre:

I covered my cat in flowers

Friday, August 15, 2014
Thursday, August 14, 2014
ajamae:

faintedincoils:

lovelykeba:

Help the fight against police brutality!

You should definitely do this, but please be safe and knowledgeable about it! Here are some resources for how to safely film/photograph police brutality, as well as information on YOUR rights as you do so:
7 Rules for Recording Police
Know Your Rights: Photographers
Tips for Recording Police Interactions
Please be aware that different states have different laws on the matter.  Check into them so you can know you specific laws, and what to expect if you film the police.  Also check with your state’s chapter of the ACLU; many of them have tips on this matter, and some have pocket foldouts of your rights that you can use to convince the police that no, you aren’t doing anything wrong.

Stay woke.

ajamae:

faintedincoils:

lovelykeba:

Help the fight against police brutality!

You should definitely do this, but please be safe and knowledgeable about it! Here are some resources for how to safely film/photograph police brutality, as well as information on YOUR rights as you do so:

Please be aware that different states have different laws on the matter.  Check into them so you can know you specific laws, and what to expect if you film the police.  Also check with your state’s chapter of the ACLU; many of them have tips on this matter, and some have pocket foldouts of your rights that you can use to convince the police that no, you aren’t doing anything wrong.

Stay woke.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
hauteinnocence:

Lupita Nyong’o
2014 Academy Awards 

hauteinnocence:

Lupita Nyong’o

2014 Academy Awards 

Monday, August 11, 2014
afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.